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Definition and Role Of A Stereographer

Published : 1st May 2010

I'm looking for the definition(s) and role of a Stereographer.

Best

Ali Kazimi
Cinematographer/Director/Asst. Prof.
Toronto, Canada


> I'm looking for the definition(s) and role of a Stereographer.

The title of stereographer can be very wide... in most contexts it will be simply be the person who "makes good 3D", but I have found that a lot of times these days (on live-action projects) the job includes:

- Working with the DoP in prep to help make informed decisions about cameras, lenses, rigs and formats.

- Working with the Director to help make informed decisions regarding blocking and framing.

- Working with the post-production facility to develop a stereoscopic post pipeline that best matches their technology to the process.

- For a feature film, constructing a depth-script that follows the emotion and arc of the characters and story (if your production is into that sort of thing).

- In prep and on set, offering suggestions and information to help create the most appropriate stereoscopic depth for the story.

- On set, working with the VFX Supervisor to account for elements that will be added later in the VFX process.

- On set, making decisions on every shot to best achieve the goal of the depth script while minimizing or completely removing the need for intensive post fixes.

- Guaranteeing the capture of comfortable and effective S3D for the intended final deliverable.

- In post, assist with the depth-grading and finishing process.

I am sure that more items can be listed, and certainly not every stereographer does all of these things I listed. Certain things will probably go away as S3D gets more saturated in the marketplace. For example, I'm certain that soon I won't have to hold the post-production facility's hand to tell them how to use their gear for S3D post. And as more DoP's and Directors are 3D-savvy they will need less input about the details and caveats of S3D during the preproduction and production process.

Eric Deren
Dzignlight Studios
VFX & Animation Design
www.dzignlight.com


Thanks Eric

This is quite comprehensive

best

Ali Kazimi
Cinematographer/Director/Asst. Prof.
Toronto, Canada


 

Ali Kazimi wrote:

>> I'm looking for the definition(s) and role of a Stereographer.

The following is from the Glossary handout I use on my training courses:

STEREOGRAPHER

Person with mathematical or intuitive knowledge of the 3D process. In particular, the interactive relationship between Convergence, Interaxial and focal length. Often Stereographers use a spreadsheet to determine where an object will appear on the Z Axis given the focal length of lens, distance of object from camera, amount of Camera Convergence, amount of Camera Interaxial and the theatre geometry. Some keep it all in their heads! There are now a number of Stereo Calculators available.

Phil Streather
Stereo 3D Producer and Consultant


I don't know if there is a policy that prohibits talking about money here, but...

A good question is how much are we supposed to be paid for all this?

I'm pretty certain I'm (very) underpaid at the moment, this 3D thing hasn't really gotten off in my small country yet...

Any references? I guess this is so new that there are really no universally agreed rates...

Riku Naskali / Stereographer
Finland


Riku Naskali wrote:

>>I guess this is so new that there are really no universally agreed rates...

We don't have very universally agreed rates for any other classification in the camera department either.

Mark H. Weingartner


>>A good question is how much are we supposed to be paid for all this ?

Any references? I guess this is so new that there are really no universally agreed rates...
In the U.S., theatres normally charge about 50% higher for 3D films, so I guess that means we should all raise our rates 50%.

Fair is fair.

Doug Hart
1AC, NYC

P.S. Good luck with that!


>>In the U.S., theatres normally charge about 50% higher for 3D films, so I guess that means we >>should all raise our rates 50%. Fair is fair.

Hmm yeah,

As a stereographer there's really not so much to in a 2D shoot

Well I guess that 1st AC's pay would be a good starting point... But I guess it all comes down to supply and demand as everything

Riku Naskali / Stereographer
www.stereowindow.us
Finland


>>As a stereographer there's really not so much to in a 2D shoot ...

Sure there is, especially if the Production wants to "protect" for a 3D conversion. I know a few DPs who have chosen not to go S3D more importantly to shoot Single Camera on Film. Piranha 3D is a good example.

Dane Brehm
DIT : 3D Tech
Presently in NorCal


Dane.brehm writes:

> Piranha 3D is a good example.

Of what? Have you seen the trailer? OMFG.

Tim Sassoon
SFD
Santa Monica, CA


P-3D is a good example of a 2D Movie that needed a Stereographer. I have indeed seen the trailer. I do know some of the crew who worked on it as well

My Point is 2D Features that are going to be Converted to 3D should have a Stereographer or at least a 3D VFX Consultant on-set to protect for that 3D Conversion. Would you agree? I can for see more productions wanting to shoot Anamorphic Film in 2D then convert later.

Just my observations,

Dane Brehm
DIT : 3D Tech
Presently in NorCal


>>2D Features that are going to be Converted to 3D should have a Stereographer or at least a 3D >>VFX Consultant on-set to protect for that 3D Conversion. Would you agree?

Yes and no and maybe.

Yes, though for shot planning and previs. I thought for example Clash's worst problem (other than giving the best shots over to the technique least able to accomplish them, and the schedule) was just not being at all designed for 3D.

No, what are they going to say - keep her hair in a bun? 3D conversion is just a limited VFX pipeline, and everything that needs to be done, surveying, off-axis witness cameras, etc. can be done by the VFX crew - and most 3D conversion films are likely to have a high VFX content. Production could just
pay the VFX crew the extra money needed for them to cover every shot. The main reason not to shoot 3D is not to be held up by 3D.

Maybe, but what's really needed are cameras which record detailed depth information, whether or not one plans to use it on set or in post to derive stereo. What's happened to lens data, BTW?

Tim Sassoon
SFD
Santa Monica, CA


>> stereo. What's happened to lens data, BTW?

I dunno what happened to lens data. Coincidentialy it just came up at a meeting at paramount today and the answer had to be that it *still* after years of requests hasn't happened.

Just a few lenses and cameras have LDS and recording *accurate* FIZ is still a mess if various tools and 'standards'.

Sorry I'll start a new thread on metadata on whatever list is appropriate.

Graham D Clark

Sent from my iTrendy device.
Warner Bros.


Graham D Clark wrote :

>> Coincidentally it just came up at a meeting at paramount today and the answer had to be that >>it*still*after years of requests hasn't happened.

Here's the solution :

Shoot 2D with a single-camera high-end 3D rig.
You'll get the lens data, and you can always say afterward you shot it "using revolutionary and never-yet-seen 3D technologies"

Bernard Mendiburu
Stereographer, Consultant
Los Angeles