Home of Professional Cinematography since 1996

style="margin-bottom: 0">
Ultra High Definition - UHDTV

Published : 30th July 2004


HDTV has a next generation

Japanese Broadcaster NHK is developing the successor to HDTV called Ultra High Definition. UHDV offers a resolution of 32 million Pixels compared to HDTV's 2 million pixels.

Picture size of 7,680 by 4320 for a 1.77 aspect ratio (AKA 16x9)

So with 4,000 horizontal lines of resolution it blows away current HD.

It will have a refresh rate of 60 Frames per second

The article was in the NY Times and our own John Lowry helped with the technical quotes :

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/03/technology/circuits/03next.html

You may have to subscribe but its free.

Oh don’t look for it at next years NAB it Took 40 years for HDTV to happen and will likely take at least 1/2 as long for this to arrive in your nearest rental house.

B. Sean Fairburn SOC
Director of Photography
Castaic Ca



Will there be a 24p variation?

I like more spatial and hate more temporal.

Stu Maschwitz, Director,
The Orphanage, SF



>Will there be a 24p variation?
>I like more spatial and hate more temporal.


One can presume so. IMHO there's going to be a real need for it to replace IMAX - without the volume of 35mm, it's going to be kinda difficult to maintain any kind of 65/70mm infrastructure into the future. And the resolution is about right - probably overkill for features.

It's worth noting that one shoots very differently for immersive formats. You're typically concerned with the centre third resolution, so that's only 2560 pixels wide in the viewing area.

Tim Sassoon
Sassoon Film Design



I wonder how they plan to distribute it.

Four times the Horizontal line count means sixteen times the data rate! It could only realistically be a disk-based system, but you'd need 64 of today's dual-layer DVD's to store one movie!

However, 4,000 line wall-sized screens may be a lot closer than you think, what with the new printable Light Emitting Polymer technologies. And 4,000 lines is only about 9 times the height of a standard NTSC screen with the same line pitch. I always thought 1,000 lines wasn't enough of an improvement to worry about...

Jim Murdoch



>Four times the Horizontal line count means sixteen times the data rate! >It could only realistically be a disk-based system, but you'd need 64 of >today's dual-layer DVD's to store one movie!

Or a 64:1 compression ratio. Does anyone know what the compression ratio is currently for digital cable?

Jessica Gallant
Los Angeles based Director of Photography
West Coast Systems Administrator, Cinematography Mailing List
http://www.cinematography.net



>Or a 64:1 compression ratio. Does anyone know what the compression >ratio is currently for digital cable?

> Jessica Gallant


HDSDI transport thru cable (SMPTE 292M) involves no compression for 4:2:2, 10-bit HD.

Robert Faber
President
FILMLOOK Inc.
http://www.filmlook.com



Jessica asks :

>$$Or a 64:1 compression ratio. Does anyone know what the >compression ratio is currently for digital cable?

Robert answers:

>HDSDI transport thru cable (SMPTE 292M) involves no compression for >4:2:2, 10-bit HD.

Not an answer to the question -- Jessica was asking about the horrific compression that is used on current cable systems, which is so bad that any fade or dissolve turn into a symphony of mosquito noise.

Jeff "bzzzz" Kreines



>Not an answer to the question -- Jessica was asking about the horrific >compression that is used on current cable systems, which is so bad >that any fade or dissolve turns into a symphony of mosquito noise.

Very true - my mistake. I believe typical DTV broadcast is 19.5 Mb/sec for HD which is an enormous amount of compression from the even HDCAM at 140 Mb/sec which is already about 7:1 compression. And cable systems would probably add more compression.

So, from camera to viewer on a cable system, you probably won't see BETTER than 50:1.

Robert Faber
President
FILMLOOK Inc.