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Arri 16SRII Video Assist

>Published : 26th April 2005

>A production company I work for is in the "pre-prod" stages of purchasing a new wireless video assist for their SRII package. I'm not sure on the exact video assist system (10 years old) they currently have, but at long distances the picture breaks up. Also, the highlights (maybe 2 stops overexposed) of the lipstick camera smear like crazy (mainly vertically).

>They would like a video assist that mounts opposite the viewfinder (the right of the camera when looking from behind). Their current system is mounted vertically. Price is not a big concern. They're looking for a higher image quality for their clients. Wireless and BNC outputs are a must. They run the feed to two 5" consumer LCD monitors as well as a consumer VCR/TV (to record as well as view). They use a Canon 8 to 64mm zoom lens, and occasionally a 200mm prime. No RCU's are used. They shoot both indoor and outdoor frequently and use a dolly and sticks frequently (not much handheld at all).

>I searched the archives and Goggled, but didn't find anything useful. Can anyone share recommendations and thoughts on what to purchase?

>Thanks in advance!

>Sincerely,

>Dom Zanghi
AC, Omaha


>Dom Zanghi wrote:

class="Paragraph">>A production company I work for is in the "pre-prod" stages of >purchasing a new wireless video assist for their SRII package.

>There are a variety of taps available for the SR. Check out the One by SlowMotion Inc. Comes up through the handle makes a right angle bend with the camera of your choice mounted parallel to the body of the camera. Plus he can add a nice VF glow system that has switchable colors for the vf mask

>Lee Utterbach also makes a tap system that allows for mounting and dismounting of the camera very quickly.

>There is also AZ spectrum in NYC

>Mark Smith


class="Paragraph">>I'm not sure on the exact video assist system (10 years old) they >currently have, but at long distances the picture breaks up.

>I'm not an expert in picking video assist brand names, but the first question that pops up in my mind with regard to the above statement is: "Is this a "wireless" video assist"?

>Would it be natural to expect it to break up over "long distances" simply due to the probability/possibility that most transmitters are probably 0.1 watts or less and only good over direct "line of sight"?

>Jeffery Haas
freelance editor, camera operator
Dallas, Texas


>Jeffery J. Haas wrote:

class="Paragraph">>I'm not an expert in picking video assist brand names, but the first >question that pops up in my mind with regard to the above statement is:

>Most video assists just put out video. what happens after that is another deal, whether you add a bnc to carry the picture or a modulus system for wireless is all up to you. I think you'll most Video assists just give you a port where you can pick up the image.

>Mark Smith


class="Paragraph">>A production company I work for is in the "pre-prod" stages of >purchasing a new wireless video assist for their SRII package.

>I would recommend looking at the video camera and the transmitter as separate products from the standpoint that transmitter technology has several format choices and there is a good chance that new choices will become available that you may want to upgrade to in the future.

>The same could be said for the video cameras and if you keep things modular you won't have to start from scratch to upgrade one or the other. The penalty, of course is more cables but sometimes being able to reposition the transmitter can really help reception and the video camera will be a fixed position to be sure.

>Greg DeFoe
Design Engineer
San Bruno CA


>Greg DeFoe wrote :

class="Paragraph">>I would recommend looking at the video camera and the transmitter as >separate products from the standpoint that transmitter technology has >several format choices and there is a good chance that new choices >will

>Exactly - and it depends on where your going to use it. In the UK 2.4Ghz equipment is the norm. You can run up to 0.1 of a watt legally on what are called "licence free" or "licence exempt" - the only problem being those frequencies are very busy now what with Bluetooth and wireless networks.

>In the US as I understand it, there are some very nice UHF systems but they could play havoc if used over here.

>Michael Sanders


class="Paragraph">>Most video assists just put out video. what happens after that is another >deal, whether you add a bnc to carry the picture or a modulus system >for wireless is all up to you.

>Oh I've used them in the past (way in the past) but I was puzzled by the poster's statement that the video was "breaking up" over long distances, that's all. Coax should provide a fairly long haul unless there is a problem with the connectors. Wireless is....well...wireless, with all the attendant weaknesses.

>I've just never experienced the troubles he was referring to unless something in the signal path was damaged.

>Jeffery Haas
freelance editor, camera operator
Dallas, Texas