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class="style8" Car Mounts For DVX100

>Published : 22nd February 2005

>Hello,

>I'd like to know what options I have for DVX car mounts.

>Thanks

>David Cain
Cameraman


>David Cain wrote :

class="style9">> I'd like to know what options I have for DVX car mounts.

>I just saw something called the Jimmy Box, which is actually a housing for a wireless receiver that mounts to the bottom of the DVX-100 (A).

>Very strong looking, and there is an arm bracket attached. The creator of the box was there, and I was trying to talk him into adding more screw holes to be able to attach the Arm to other places on the box.

>B and H has it on their website.

>Steven Gladstone
New York Based D.P.
www.gladstonefilms.com
East Coast CML List administrator


class="style9">> I'd like to know what options I have for DVX car mounts.

>I've had tremendous success with a bicycle rack - the kind that opens up like a V and typically mounts to the back of your car. I typically use it to mount to the side of the door I'm shooting through. Adding a solid dowel or rod serves as the mounting point for the camera and I use a Mayfer clamp to mount the camera to that.

>Dan Coplan
Cinematographer / DIT
www.dancoplan.com


>Dave Cain asks :

class="style9">>I'd like to know what options I have for DVX car mounts.

>When you're using a beefy camera like the DVX, you almost have to consider film camera type mounts and that would mean things like Super Grips, which are suction mounted angle plates. Once there in place then you finish it off with ratchet straps for safety and fibre tape for that final bit of camera jiggle.

>If you are doing dialog you might consider door mounts. You can rent them from most equipment houses but I find it better to hire a good rigging grip. They generally have all the toys and believe me it's worth every cent.

>The one thing you don't want to do is spend 4 hours rigging one shot. Also, I would suggest renting a car and taking the insurance because with some of these rigs you can leave dents, scratches and suction cup marks.

>Go to "camera car mounts" on Google. There are tons of great sites to choose from!

>Good luck!

>Allen S. Facemire
DP/Director
SaltRun Productions,inc.
Atlanta


>Thanks Allen,

>Went to B&H site and think I may pick up the Ergorest. There are no specs on the weight though and wondered - after your comments - whether this device would be robust enough. I'll contact them directly, but if you know from experience....

>David Cain
Constant Motion
Toronto, Canada


>David Cain says :

class="style9">>I may pick up the Ergorest. There are no specs on the weight though >and wondered - after your comments - whether this device would be >robust enough. I'll contact them directly, but if you know from >experience

>Don't know about the Ergorest but experience has definitely taught me that it's better to over rig than under rig when it comes to stability. You gotta remember that every pot hole, turn, curve, stop and acceleration torques the unit so the real goal is to make the mount part of the body.

>Little vibrations will literally kill the shot!

>Luck!

>Allen S. Facemire
DP/Director
SaltRun Productions,inc.
Atlanta


class="style9">> it's better to over rig than under rig when it comes to stability.

>This is a very good point. If your budget allows, you should follow Allen's advice. If it doesn't and if your shots aren't insane screeching around corners or very high speed driving, I would go for the bike rack. I took a look at the Ergorest and that thing doesn't look like it's worth the cost of shipping, though I've never used one.

>It looks like the top part is slotted for the window and I don't see any cushioning on the bottom part or a way to strap it down. A bike rack is meant to hold an object many times the weight and awkwardness (for lack of a more accurate physics term) than the camera. The mounting points are cushioned and the straps, which you can snug down very tight, work inside the door frame (as opposed to a piece of glass).

>Either way, make sure you safety rig the camera in addition to its attachment to the car mount.

>Dan Coplan
Cinematographer / DIT
www.dancoplan.com