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DP Make Up Kit

Published : 14th August 2011

I'm looking for tips on tools (make up products) and technique for taking the shine off an interview subject. (when it can't be done by a proper make up person).

thanks in advance,
Phil Cormier, DP, Falmouth, Maine


>> tools (make up products) and technique for taking the shine off an interview subject. (when it can't >>be done by a proper make up person).

BodyShop and MAC both make small absorbent papers that come in little packages that seem to work quite well.

What's nice about these is you can hand them to the person so they can mop themselves up and not get all self-conscious about the whole process of being on camera.

Anything beyond that seems a bit risky to me!

David Perrault, CSC


David Perrault wrote:

>>BodyShop and MAC both make small absorbent papers that come in little packages that seem to >>work quite well.

I've been on shoots where they used these before too. They're also not messy. I think I saw "rice paper" on the packaging.

If you need something you can easily pick up on the way to a shoot or have a PA run out to buy, I keep a Maybelline Shine Free Oil-control pressed powder in my camera bag. I bought it at a simple drug store for about $3 and the applicator pad comes with it. It comes in five colours, but I just have the Ivory.

Steve Hullfish
contributor: www.provideocoalition.com


I pretty much use what David and Steve recommend....

I have some BodyShop blotting tissues... the ones I have right now don’t have powder, but they make some that do.

I also bring Cornsilk No Color pressed powder, and some extra pads/sponges since we throw them away after each use (don’t want to hand a used pad to someone).

I’m not especially tied to these brands and products...I mean, they work fine for interviews (and were recommended to me by some other folks who use them), but I’m sure there are other brands that work just as well...

Jim Feeley
Producer, journalist, mixer
Near San Francisco USA


>>I bought it at a simple drug store for about $3 and the applicator pad comes with it.

One person per applicator... Right? You really shouldn't re-use these on another person.

David Perrault, CSC


Phil Cormier wrote:

>>I'm looking for tips on tools (make up products) and technique for taking the shine off an interview >>subject (when it can't be done by a proper make up person)

In many situations I use a Schneider Tru-Pol polarizer to control shiny skin conditions. Of course it affects many other reflections at the same time which you can't always separate from the problematic skin reflections. I consider it be a cameraman's makeup product as much as any powder, blotter or lotion.

Roberto Schaefer, asc
I guess you can tell that I'm still recuperating...in Pascagoula, Ms


I try to use hypoallergenic brands, Clinique is one that has been recommended to me. If I'm going to apply makeup to someone who doesn't normally wear it (docco interviews etc.) then I don't want them breaking out in hives thirty seconds later....

George Hupka
Director/DP, Downstream Pictures
Saskatoon, Canada
Listmum, Cinematography Mailing List


Lancombe T-Zone Mattifier. That and a couple of applicator pads and you're in business. I've got an emergency supply I keep on hand. It's great as it works on everyone. It's also easier to put on homophobic executives as it's just a gel.

Buy two at the Lancombe counter at Macy's and you'll get a free "gift  with purchase". Or go to the drug store--there's other brands out there that do the same thing.

It only reduces shine. If someone starts complaining that I should have brought powder to cover up blemishes I tell them that they needed to hire a professional makeup artist who would stock that kind of thing.

Art Adams | DoP
San Jose | ca | USA
415.760.5167
www.artadams.net
http://provideocoalition.com/index.php/aadams