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class="style5" Frame Rates In World Theatres

Published : 17th October 2004

>24fps is the rule of thumb in the USA [60 Hz].
25fps is the rule all over the world for 50Hz countries [which, I believe, is the vast majority of planet Earth].

24fps films are screened at a 25fps theatre.
25fps films are screened at a 24fps theatre.

No one notices the difference.

True?

Cheers,
Jeff Barklage, s.o.c.
US based DP
www.barklage.com


class="style6" > 24fps films are screened at a 25fps theatre.
> 25fps films are screened at a 24fps theatre.

class="style6" > No one notices the difference. True?

>I believe that almost all theatres are 24fps, unless someone is projecting very carefully a film shot for PAL TV. Remember 24 fps was a standard for many years

>I do not know (but am willing to be enlightened) of any normal 25 fps projectors.

>And, yes, there's a HUGE difference between the two -- running a 25 fps film at 24 fps kills the pacing, and a 24 fps film at 25 fps seems a bit too snappy (tho can help some tedious films).

>While a cinematographer may not be bothered by the difference, an editor surely is!

>Jeff "wearing my editing cap" Kreines


>The worldwide standard for 35mm theatrical exhibition is 24fps, per standard SMPTE 40.

>http://www.smpte.org/smpte_store/standards/

>Conventional projector speed can be varied by using a variable speed drive motor (e.g., frequency controlled), or changing the belt/gear ratio.

>There are several websites that have projection user groups, and technical information about projection:

>http://www.film-tech.com

>http://www.bigscreenbiz.com

>http://www.1570.com

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Research Labs, Building 69
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, New York 14650-1922 USA
website : http://www.kodak.com/go/motion


class="Paragraph">>I do not know (but am willing to be enlightened) of any normal 25 fps >projectors.

>Some (many ? all ?) Kinotons can run at 25 fps.

>Sam Wells


>Sam Wells wrote :

class="Paragraph">>Some (many ? all ?) Kinotons can run at 25 fps.

>Yep. Lots of them in multiplexes!

>Jeff Kreines


>Jeff Kreines writes:

class="Paragraph">>running a 25 fps film at 24 fps kills the pacing, and a 24 fps film at 25 >fps seems a bit too snappy (tho can help some tedious films).

>Tedious films should be shot at 23 fps.

>Dan "Zzzzz..." Drasin
Producer/DP
Marin County, CA


class="Paragraph">> Tedious films should be shot at 23 fps.

>No, those who make tedious films (unless they're intentionally and artily tedious) should be shot...

>Jeff Kreines


>Jeff Kreines writes :

class="Paragraph">>those who make tedious films (unless they're intentionally and artily >tedious) should be shot...

>Or taken out behind the barn and lensed.

>Just saw an intentionally tedious film that was utterly charming. TO BE AND TO HAVE, which documents a season in the life of an elementary school in the Auvergne.

>It was a really fine, sensitive, affectionate and witty piece of cinema-verité that took its time and let its pacing be dictated by the natural flow of events. Beautifully and simply shot in S16, possibly with a crew of no more than two, mostly by available light.

>If anyone knows anything more about how this film was made, please post it!

>Dan "he who lives by the lens,..." Drasin
Producer/DP
Marin County, CA


class="Paragraph">>Just saw an intentionally tedious film that was utterly charming. TO BE >AND TO HAVE

>There's a difference between tedious and slow-paced...

>Jeff Kreines