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Kodak & Beyond : John Pytlaks Amazing Links

Published : 19th December 2004

>John Pytlak from Kodak has contributed numerous links on a variety of subjects, and so with this in mind, to say nothing of the quality of the inforamtion, I have collated a selection of these links. . .and I trust you find them of interest :

Over Expose Nightmare :

>Arturo Briones-Carcar asked:

>So here comes my question: How can you tell an overexposed neg from >a pushed neg by only watching a neg (i.e.: not comparing two negs of >either case)? And how does push development affects edge >numbering?

>Generally, increasing the developer time for a B&W negative film
("pushing") will increase the over density, contrast, and speed of the film. Here are the sensitometric curves of EASTMAN Double X B&W negative film from the published technical data, for processing times of 4 to 12 minutes :

http://www.kodak.com/US/plugins/acrobat/en/motion/products/

curves/ti0299b.pdf

>The edge numbers which are printed during perforating will become denser with push-processing, and can be compared to a strip that was processed normally. If the edgeprint and fog level look similar to a strip that was normally processed, the very dense images were due to overexposure in the camera. If the fog level of the problem film is elevated and the edgeprint is very dense, it may have been accidentally over processed.

>Your local Kodak representative in Spain should be able to work with you and the lab to analyse the problem :

>http://www.kodak.com/ES/es/motion/

>http://www.kodak.com/ES/es/corp/10.shtml

>I hope this helps.

>John Pytlak
Customer Technical Service
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69
Eastman Kodak Company
website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion


>Kodak's Vision 800T :

class="Paragraph">>I was wondering how many of you have used Kodak's Vision 800T and >can tell me what you think about the stock? What are its pros and cons?

>The Kodak website has quite a few customer comments about 5289 experiences :

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/newsletters

/inCamera/oct2001/leto.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/newsletters/inCamera/

april2003/americanDreamsP.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/newsletters/inCamera/

jan2003/avalonP.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/newsletters/inCamera/

jan2003/alameinP.shtml

>http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/forum/tv/xfilesP.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/newsletters/inCamera/

july2002/pathP.shtml

>http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/products/negative/5289.shtml

>You can find other on-line articles by using the keyword "5289" in the "Search Cinematography" tool on the Kodak EI website.

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Service
Eastman Kodak Company


>Kodak VISION2 Expression 500T :

>Kodak unveiled Kodak Vision2 Expression 500T color negative film 5229/7229, the second product in the new generation of Vision2 color motion picture films, at the Camerimage International Festival of the Art of Cinematography. The new emulsion is designed to satisfy the needs of filmmakers who want a 500-speed film that renders images with a somewhat softer look, including smoother skin tones and a more subdued range of contrast and color saturation. The new film also features a noticeable reduction in apparent grain, a broad range of under- and over-exposure latitude, and an enhanced capacity for recording subtle details in bright highlights and dark shadows :

>http://www.uemedia.net/CPC/cinematographer/article_5735.shtml

>http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/products/negative/5229.shtml

>http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/52297229.shtml

>http://www.cinematography.com/index.asp?newsID=119

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services


>Dangers of sending video tape through airport security :

>Has there even been an issue with low coercivity tapes being affected by the magnetic fields from the conveyer belt motors?

>Hard drives and modern high coercivity media certainly have not been issues, since every notebook computer and consumer video camera is scanned and any problems would likely have shown up.

>Here is the official TSA website :

>http://www.tsa.gov/public/interapp/editorial/editorial_1248.xml

>http://www.tsa.gov/public/interapp/editorial/editorial_1035.xml

>John Pytlak
EI Worldwide Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>1:1.66 & 1:1.85 in the world's theatres :

>Standard SMPTE 195 specifies projected image area. The recognized aspect ratios in the standard are 2.39:1 (anamorphic), 1.85:1, 1.66:1 and 1.37:1. Most 35mm theatres are equipped to show both 1.85:1 and 2.39:1. Currently, there is about an equal share of 2.39:1 and 1.85:1 releases, with a few 1.66:1 or Academy 1.37:1.

>70mm prints are usually 2.20:1, per standard SMPTE 152.

>Here is an article I wrote about theatres maintaining proper aspect ratio :

>http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/newsletters/pytlak/spring2001.shtml

>And about standards :

>http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/newsletters/pytlak/oct2001.shtml

>Here is an excellent resource on widescreen formats:

>http://www.widescreenmuseum.com/widescreen/index.htm

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>Flashing Prints :

>Flashing can also be done by the lab at the master positive or duplicate negative duplicating stages. For example, flashing the master positive "fills in" and softens the contrast of the highlights, much as flashing a print stock does. Flashing the duplicate negative would lower the densities of the shadows.

>Post-production flashing usually entails a second pass through the printer, and careful control of the printer balance used for the flash exposure (perhaps even on a scene-to-scene basis), so it would be a special service from the lab.

>Here are some links to information about flashing :

>http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/support/h2/flash.shtml

class="style7" http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/support/h1/

class="style7" structureP.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/students/

filmtech/chressanthis.shtml

(flashing used on "The Music Man" TV production)

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/students/

filmtech/carnivale.shtml

(flashing used for Carnivale)

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>3D Stereoscopic Imaging Display Technology :

>Eastman Kodak Company today showcased a significant innovation that allows video-game players, earth scientists and a host of others to experience three-dimensional images without glasses or headgear of any type creating the sensation of actually being a part of the image.

>Kodak will introduce a commercial prototype of its Stereoscopic Imaging Display system at the Exhibitor Show 2004 in Las Vegas, Nevada, March 15-17, in Booth #1514 at the Mandalay Bay Exhibition Center. Kodak also plans to demonstrate the Stereoscopic Imaging Display system at the upcoming Game Developers Conference in San Jose, California, March 24-26, in Booth #944 at the San Jose Convention Center.

>The Stereoscopic Imaging Display system produces a wide field of view, three-dimensional (3D) stereo image. The superior quality of the Kodak system provides an ideal display for intensive visualization tasks, such as oil and gas exploration, molecular and chemical modelling, computer-aided design, entertainment and gaming, and many other applications.

>The system represents the first initiative from Kodak's New Business Ventures Group, which is responsible for commercialising break-through technology developed by the company's Research & Development organization.

>"Unlike other 3D imaging systems, which rely on a barrier screen placed over an existing monitor, the Kodak display is an entirely new concept," said Lawrence Henderson, vice president and director, new business ventures, Eastman Kodak Company. "Kodak's Stereoscopic Imaging Display system maintains full image resolution and creates a very wide field of view. The display brings a new level of realism to the 3D visual experience, capitalizing on Kodak's extensive research and development."

>Kodak is currently seeking partners and early-stage customers for the system, and will provide licenses to the technology for integration into third-party products and systems.

>How it Works

The user sits in front of a system that creates a virtual image of two high-resolution LCD displays, one for each eye. The user looks into two "floating balls of light" that provide each eye a view of a magnified image of a display. The combination of the wide field of view and virtual image eliminates the sources of eyestrain found in other auto stereoscopic systems. Kodak's Stereoscopic Imaging Display system also has a unique viewing zone, which makes it easy to see the "sweet spot" of an image while maintaining image quality across the entire viewing zone.

>The desktop display has a field of view that measures 45 degrees by 36 degrees, and a resolution of 1280 x 1024 pixels. The user peers through a large, 32 mm viewing pupils that gives the viewer the feeling of floating in a movie theatre about 1.5 screen heights away from the screen. Kodak can adjust the scale of this system to increase or reduce the display resolution to meet various applications.

>The Kodak auto stereoscopic display breaks new technical ground in the field of stereo imaging. The unique Ball Lens Technology behind the display is summarized in a paper presented at the 2003 Stereoscopic Displays and Applications conference. This paper is available upon request.

>Link to more information :

>http://www.kodak.com/cgibin/US/en/corp/pressCenter/headlines.cgi

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>Small digital still cameras :

>Hope you've looked at the Kodak digital cameras:

http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jhtml?pqpath=2/3/9/

19&pqlocale=en_US

>The new LS743 is especially small and versatile :

http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jhtml?pqpath=

1763&pqlocale=en_US

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>X-ray and lab testing :

>Since the newer CAT-scan type x-ray inspection machines may affect only one side of the roll, try to process at least a few convolutions of film (i.e. a convolution is the circumference of the outside of the roll).

>Here is a Kodak publication that shows typical fogging from x-ray security machines:

>http://www.kodak.com/global/en/service/tib/tib5201.shtml

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>Kodak Catalogue :

>The new price catalogue will be available as paper copies sometime in May or June 2004. Ask your Kodak EI sales and engineering representative to add your name to the mailing list.

>The on-line catalogue is usually updated as soon as new products are available :

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/products/catalog/

camera.jhtml?id=0.1.4.18.4&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com/US/plugins/acrobat/en/motion/catalog/

colorNeg.pdf

>The latest news is available on the Kodak website as "Kodak News - Product Change Notices":

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/newsletters/news/

?id=0.1.4.17&lc=en

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


 

Movies shot on 5293 :

>Yes, 5293 has recently been discontinued, and has limited availability:

http://www.kodak.com/US/plugins/acrobat/en/motion/newsletters/

news/PCN031204_Q.pdf

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


 

Super 35mm cross process reversal film :

>More on 5285:

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/products/reversal/

tech5285.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/products/reversal/

5285faq.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/products/reversal/

accreditation.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/newsletters/inCamera/

jan2003/dionP.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/newsletters/inCamera/

jan2003/bunkerP.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/newsletters/inCamera/

april2000/bennett.shtml

>http://www.cameraguild.com/technology/testing_limits.htm

>http://www.theasc.com/magazine/july00/suspense/pg1.htm

http://www.cameraguild.com/index.html?magazine/

stoo1001a.htm~top.main_hp

>Peter Deming "From Hell": "His inner meditations, dream states and hallucinations brought about by smoking opium are interpreted through cross-processed reversal stock 5285,which imbues the footage with a contrasty, nauseating shade of yellow-green and makes reds, particularly blood, pop with an electric-like haze....We cross-processed it and at the same time pushed it a stop, discloses Deming.

>What originally is 100 ASA becomes 50 when cross-processed and then it got pushed back to 100. In post, virtually all of that cross-processed footage was digitized, composited with other shots digitally and then outputted. There was a lot of grain added digitally to all the cross-processed footage. So the final look is pretty different from the on-screen look of cross-processed footage.

>Making a print from a straight cross-process has a heavy green-yellow saturation there’s no latitude at all even less so when shooting reversal straight. Its also very low latitude stock, so it ends up being very contrasty. Particularly, in this case, where we there’s lots of dark wardrobe, dark sets and faces highlighted by practicals. What they did digitally was keep the color but reduce the contrast and add grain."

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>Monochips and Dust :

>Here's information about the Kodak DCS Pro14n Digital Camera, which uses a single chip 14 megapixel CMOS sensor:

http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/cameras/

dcsPro14n/dcsPro14nIndex.jhtml?id=0.1.18.18.3.18&lc=en

>And some sample full resolution images:

http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/cameras/

dcsPro14n/sampleImages.jhtml?id=0.1.18.18.3.18.16&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/cameras/

dcsPro14n/cmos.jhtml?id=0.1.18.18.3.18.30&lc=en

>http://www.kodak.com/global/en/digital/ccd/sensorsMain.jhtml

>One of my neighbours is an engineer who worked on the program to develop this camera. I'll have to ask him how they licked any dust speck issues.

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>Kodak Telecine Calibration System (TCS) 1002-V :

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/news/nab2004

breakthroughsP.shtml

>"The KODAK Telecine Calibration System (TCS) 1002-V is also featured in the exhibit. This system is designed to transfer highlights, shadows, contrast, and color as the cinematographer intended during original photography when the negative is scanned and converted to digital files in the telecine. Mendel explains that the advanced Kodak technology employed by the TCS provides a repeatable way for cinematographers and colourists to communicate, and ensures nuances recorded on the negative are retained during telecine transfer. New features such as exposure control, scene illuminant, fine color adjustment and remote user interface have been added to the system. The KODAK TCS System also incorporates Kodak's proprietary color management software.

>"Recent customer feedback indicates a shift at the telecine stage from spending less time amending the technical transfer to focusing more time on creating the 'look,'" says Mendel. "Stop by the booth to see what many customers have to say about the advantages the KODAK TCS offers."

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>Kodak "Look Manager" Technology :

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/news/nab2004look

ManagerP.shtml

>"LAS VEGAS, April 19, 2004 - Kodak is demonstrating its Kodak Look Manager System here at the National Association of Broadcasters Convention (NAB) annual conference. The new hybrid technology incorporated in the system enables cinematographers to create, pre-visualize, communicate and manage subtle nuances in film looks from pre-production through postproduction.

>"The Kodak Look Manager System puts the power of digital technology directly into the hands of the artists who create film images," says Robert Mayson, general manager and vice president of image capture for Kodak's Entertainment Imaging division. "The ability to communicate 'looks' from remote locations using a calibrated motion picture system is a first for directors of photography."

>The software-based system utilizes calibrated hardware devices, which enable cinematographers to determine the best method for creating a desired look for film-originated projects. Cinematographers can simulate multiple combinations of Kodak film stocks, in-camera effects, lighting techniques, and lab processes used in various ways to create a look. After a cinematographer locks into a designed look, an exportable file can be shared with other system users around the world to communicate the creative intent and produce consistent images that represent the visual intentions. Once a look is set, the system delivers consistent results on multiple display devices, including film, standard and high-definition video, and digital cinema projectors.

>"The Kodak Look Manager System is a powerful tool for filmmakers," says Chris Wheeler, worldwide product manager of hybrid products for the Kodak division. "It is designed to give cinematographers unprecedented flexibility to create looks reproducible in the motion picture film system. The system provides for simple electronic communication with dailies timers, colourists and other collaborators to develop the desired look for the project. It also incorporates proprietary color science technology based on over 100 years of imaging expertise dating back to the earliest days of the motion picture and television industries."

>Wheeler says that the Kodak Look Manager System was developed with considerable advice from cinematographers around the world, and is being tested in "real-world" environments. He adds that it should be available to the marketplace this summer."

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>Stock Footage for a Student Project :

>Calling Mr. Fairburn???

>http://www.seanfairburn.com/iraqifreedom/

>http://www.seanfairburn.com/iraqifreedom/01.html

>http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/iraq/2004-04-07-baghdadintro_x.htm

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>List of Historic Firsts? :

>Lots of "firsts" on the Kodak Chronology of Motion Picture Films:

>http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/about/chrono1.shtml

>And in the 125 years of Kodak :

>http://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/kodakHistory/index.shtml

>Lots more to come.

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY


>High-resolution Camera Nears Virtual Reality :

>Size DOES matter! Here are some of the very large format aerial films used in cameras like this:

>http://www.kodak.com/US/en/business/aim/aerial/

>For motion-pictures, 65mm film already does a super job of filling huge screens. And Kodak's sharpest motion picture color negative film (5212) is now available in 65mm.

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services


>Color Management :

>I think Nick is writing about his experience with the Kodak Telecine Calibration System (TCS):

>http://www.kodak.com/US/plugins/acrobat/en/motion/support/tcs2.pdf

>http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/support/tcs/index2.shtml

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Projection Meanderings A Little Long :

>Kodak's Bob Gibbons perhaps said it best in a recent interview :

>http://www.iht.com/articles/522787.html

>"Bob Gibbons, director of marketing and communications for Kodak Digital Cinema, said: "A better cinema experience is much more than just a big screen with a sharp image. It's also about how the customer is treated, how they feel when they're in the theatre. It's the whole experience.""

>I recall trying to see a Digital Cinema screening of "Ice Age" in NYC a couple years ago. During the trailers, the image kept "locking up" with a still frame, and then went to posterized colors, and then black. The problem repeated throughout the trailers. I called it "Digital Hiccups". Finally, the lights came up, and an usher came in to apologize that they could not show the feature film digitally, and would have to show a film print. I later found out that there was a problem with the "Miranda Box", that took the theatre almost a week to get fixed.

>"Film Done Right", "Digital Done Right", and "Showmanship" are well worth the effort, but too often lacking.

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>Removal of Anti-Halation Backing :

>If you remove the rem-jet by using the pre-bath and aqueous rem-jet removal step (in total darkness of course), you will also remove the soluble absorber dyes in the emulsion, which will affect the relative speeds of the three emulsion layers, and likely reduce sharpness. Without rem-jet, you have no anti-static properties or lubrication for optimum camera transport. Removing rem-jet and then exposing the film is strictly in the "experimental", "do at your own risk" category:

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/support/h1/baseP.shtml#

antihalation

http://www.kodak.com/US/plugins/acrobat/en/motion/support/

processing/h242/h2402.pdf

http://www.kodak.com/US/plugins/acrobat/en/motion/support/

processing/h247/h2407.pdf

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Transferring A Print :

>Yes, you do need to work to control contrast and detail, especially in the highlights and shadows. But projection contrast prints were used for many years, and the tools available on modern telecines offer more flexibility than the telecines of even a decade ago.

>Here is the technical data for the lower contrast Kodak VISION Teleprint Film :

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/products/print/h12395t.jhtml?

id=0.1.4.8.4.3&lc=en

>Certainly if you made a master positive for a larger print release, or for preservation, that is a very good option for transfer.

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>Infrared Daylight B&W :

>Here are the Kodak infrared filters:

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/products/wratten/infrared.jhtml?

id=0.1.4.16.14&lc=en

John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Bleach Bypass : Camera Negative vs. Release Prints :

>Some good information:

>http://www.theasc.com/magazine/nov98/soupdujour/pg1.htm

>http://cameraguild.com/technology/testing_limits.htm

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/support/processing/skip.jhtml

?id=0.1.4.11.4.12&lc=en

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>Broadcast Formats For "Bollywood" Type Productions? :

>World television recording standards:

>http://www.tvradioworld.com/directory/Television_Standards/page6.asp

>http://www.shootfirst.co.uk/standards.htm

>http://kropla.com/tv.htm

>http://www.execulink.com/~impact/world_television_standards2.htm

>http://www.bloomington.in.us/~ttop/standard.html

>http://www.repetrope.com/support/pal.asp

HDTV in India :

http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/5922_385152,00

15002000000014.htm

>http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/WEBONLY/publicfeature/feb01/digtv.html

http://www22.verizon.com/about/community/learningcenter/articles/

displayarticle1/0,1727,1130z1,00.html

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>NFL Films :

>Some links:

>http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/news/nflFilms.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/newsletters/inCamera/

july99/nfl.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/news/nab2004break

throughsP.shtml

(NFL Films 16mm to HD Demos)

>http://www.nflfilms.com

>http://www.nflfilms.com/studios/

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>Is It Worth Owning A S16 Package Anymore? :

>16mm is very much alive and well! Actually, sales of 16mm origination films are growing:

>http://www.kodak.com/go/16mm

>Some recent productions:

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/16mm/why/filmMaker/

dicksonBilly.jhtml?id=0.1.4.3.4&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/16mm/why/filmMaker/

mcAlpine.jhtml?id=0.1.4.3.6&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/16mm/why/filmMaker/

neverDieAlone.jhtml?id=0.1.4.3.8&lc=en

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Sound Advice :

>JBL Cinema Sound System Manual :

>http://www.jblpro.com/pub/cinema/cinedsgn.pdf

>An well written resource that gives much good information about movie theatre sound systems.

>Dolby Laboratories also has an excellent website:

>http://www.dolby.com/Cinema/MotionPicture/

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Need Neg :

>Would the Kodak "LAD Girl" control film satisfy you needs?:

http://www.kodak.com/US/plugins/acrobat/en/motion/support/

h61/h61.pdf

>Kodak Entertainment Imaging in Hemel Hempstead should have it on hand in both 35mm and 16mm.

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Kodak Image Sensor Solutions :

>http://www.kodak.com/global/en/digital/ccd/sensorsMain.jhtml

>Kodak NuVue OLED display technology :

http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jhtml?pqpath=

1473/1481&pqlocale=en_US

>Kodak R&D :

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/researchDevelopment/

techProdHighlights.shtml

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Aquarium Filming :

>An article about a similar shoot on the Kodak website:

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/students/filmtech/

bigBand.shtml

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Kodak Professional Digital Still Cameras :

http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/cameras/

camerasIndex.jhtml?id=0.1.18.18.3&lc=en

>(Note each camera has downloadable sample images)

>Kodak OEM Image Sensors:

>http://www.kodak.com/global/en/digital/ccd/sensorsMain.jhtml

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Monitoring TFT & Other :

>At NAB2004, Kodak introduced a set of new tools to aid telecine transfer, including a Kodak Display Manager System:

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/news/nab2004break

throughsP.shtml

>"The Kodak Display Manager System consists of a calibration tool and proprietary software that automatically adjusts images displayed on a computer monitor to simulate the film look. The Kodak Display Manager System and Kodak color science technology are also being shown in the Kodak booth."

>CRT displays still seem to be preferred for judging critical color and tone scale.

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>ICC/DCI :

>If you want to contribute and vote on the work of an SMPTE Technical Committee, or just want to be aware of what is being decided and offer comment, you should submit a Statement of Participation:

>http://www.smpte.org/engineering_committees/

>http://www.smpte.org/engineering_committees/join_committee

>Here is the calendar of SMPTE meetings:

http://www.smpte.org/engineering_committees/calendar/

Calendar.cfm?&OP=MAIN

>Of course, the SMPTE Digital Cinema Committee is DC28, who are working closely with the Digital Cinema Initiatives (DCI) group.

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Super16 To D5 :

>Some other good experiences with Super-16:

http://www.cameraguild.com/interviews/chat_alsobrook/

alsobrook_grosse.htm

http://www.filmandvideomagazine.com/2001/05_may/features/

Teleproductions/GrossePoint.htm

>http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/news/reelTalkInwood.shtml

>http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/16mm/why/?id=0.1.4.3&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/16mm/why/filmMaker/

dicksonBilly.jhtml?id=0.1.4.3.8&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/16mm/postProd/index.

jhtml?id=0.1.4.11&lc=en

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Timed It? :

>Timing or grading using the Laboratory Aim Density (LAD) Control System:

>http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/support/h61/

>Discussion of printing and film systems:

>http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/support/h1/printing.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/students/handbook/index.

jhtml?id=0.1.4.9.6&lc=en

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, NY


>Adjusting To Underscan (Consumer TV) :

>Some older sets have adjustable potentiometers on the back panel or on an internal circuit board -- look for "horizontal width", "horizontal linearity", "vertical height" and "vertical linearity" controls. Newer sets may have a hidden menu option. If you are not familiar with television electronics, have a service shop adjust them for a smaller image.

>Don't know about your particular set, but you can check the net using a search engine :

>http://www.neato.org/~page/mitsu/service.html

>http://www.freelists.org/archives/techassist/062002/msg00365.html

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Film Stock Advice :

>Hope you can use Kodak films again soon.

>Some commercial productions discussed on the Kodak website :

>http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/stars/top.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/newsletters/inCamera/

july2002/directingP.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/forum/commercials/

aicpHonors.shtml

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Same Lab In L.A., N.Y., and F.L? :

>The Kodak website has on-line directories of labs and transfer houses, and the services they offer :

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/support/labs/lablocator.jhtml?

id=0.1.4.13&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/support/labs/transferhouses.

jhtml?id=0.1.4.15&lc=en

We rely on information supplied by these companies to keep our directories up to date :

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/support/labs/updatelab.

jhtml?id=0.1.4.13.4&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/support/labs/update

transferhouse.jhtml?id=0.1.4.15.4&lc=en

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Time-lapse With A Digital Camera :

>Justin Pentecost asked:

class="Paragraph">>Does anyone have a contact with anyone on the digital side at Kodak ?

>Start off by asking the questions of your local Kodak technical representative. The Kodak Entertainment Imaging Website has articles about Kodak's digital projects, and Kodak imaging scientists often publish articles in the technical journals like SMPTE. Many are members of the SMPTE, and participate on its technical committees.

>http://www.kodak.com/go/dcinema

>http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/products/v2/sehlin.shtml

http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/students/

onCampus/oct2001/dfm.shtml

>http://www.kodak.com/country/US/en/motion/products/v2/long.shtml

>http://www.smpte.org/members_only/member_directory/

>You can also e-mail questions to Kodak's website, and they will be forwarded to the appropriate expert :

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/about/contact.jhtml?

id=0.1.4.3.4&lc=en

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Travelling CCD's :

>The higher the altitude, the greater the radiation. Likewise, long flights mean extended exposure. Try to avoid air shipping unprocessed film (fog increase) and CCD sensors (permanent dead pixels) during intense solar storm activity:

>http://airlinepilots.com/solar.htm

>http://www.sec.noaa.gov/NOAAscales/

>http://www.sec.noaa.gov/SWN/

>http://airlinepilots.com/Aeromedicine/AirCrewExposure2000.pdf

>http://www.avweb.com/news/aeromed/181873-1.html

John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Digital Still Cameras :

>Information about the Kodak Look Manager System :

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/products/dlmanage/

klms.jhtml?id=0.1.4.14.4&lc=en

>Kodak consumer digital cameras :

http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jhtml?pqpath=

2/3/9/19&pqlocale=en_US

>Kodak professional digital cameras :

http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/

cameras/camerasIndex.jhtml?id=0.1.18.22.3&lc=en

>John Pytlak
EI Customer Technical Services
Eastman Kodak Company


>Labs In Washington and NY Area :

>Kodak has an on-line directory listing labs and transfer houses, and the services they offer :

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/support/labs/lablocator.

jhtml?id=0.1.4.13&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/support/labs/transferhouses.

jhtml?id=0.1.4.15&lc=en

John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>5229/7229 :

>Thank you! I'll pass along your kind comments to the Kodak team that developed the film :

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/products/negative/5229.

jhtml?id=0.1.4.4.4.10&lc=en

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Containers For Exposed Negative Film :

>Hello Ujwal:

>In the past, "dry ice" in insulated containers has sometimes been used. Not sure the air shipment companies still accept dry ice shipments due to build up of carbon dioxide in cargo holds.

>Perhaps gelled ice packets (e.g., "Blue Ice") could be used by packing with the sealed film cans in an insulated container. The film cans must be sealed to avoid condensation getting in.

>I assume the mail order food industry has found a way to ship perishable food in cold containers --- the same methods could be used. Some examples:

http://www.sailnet.com/collections/articles/index.cfm?

articleid=ouread0046

>http://www.ae-zone.org/Tips/coldcoolers.html

http://www.epinions.com/content_100223782532

John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Kodak Gains On Sony In US Digital Camera Market :

>I'm having fun with my new Kodak DX6490, bought just before Thanksgiving :

http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jhtml?pqpath=

1336&pqlocale=en_US

http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jhtml?pqpath=9/

19&pqlocale=en_US

>It supplements my "point and shoot" DX3700, which I have had for two years and several thousand photos ago.

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Protection For Camera From RF? :

>For complete protection of sensitive electronics from RF, you need an effective "Faraday Cage":

>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday_cage

>http://www.boltlightningprotection.com/Elemental_Faraday_Cage.htm

>http://www.physlink.com/Education/AskExperts/ae176.cfm

John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Focus Please :

>Kodak does try to help projectionists "Conquer Contrast Killers" :

http://www.kodak.com/US/plugins/acrobat/en/motion/newsletters/

archived/pytlak/contrast.pdf

John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>LED Lights :

>Has anyone tried the "Full Spectrum" lamps, which have a very high Color Rendering Index?. Some fixtures even have electronic ballasts:

>http://www.lightbulbsdirect.com/page/001/CTGY/Full+Spectrum

>http://www.lightbulbsdirect.com/page/001/CTGY/FS+Fluorescent

>http://www.lightbulbsdirect.com/page/001/CTGY/Verilux

>http://www.lightbulbsdirect.com/page/001/CTGY/SAD+Fixtures

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Kodak Look Management System :

>Here are the monitors currently supported by the Kodak Display Manager System :

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/products/dlmanage/kdm.

jhtml?id=0.1.4.18&lc=en

>SUPPORTED MONITORS FOR AUTO-CALIBRATION
:
SONY G500, G520, FW900
NEC FE2111SB, FE2141SB
SGI GDM-5411, GDM-FW9011
MITSUBISHI 2070SB
IBM P275
LACIE Electron22Blue IV

>V2.0 INCLUDES :

>Print film emulation on CRT/LCD monitors, HD/SD displays and digital projectors Verification of monitor setup and print emulation
Two high-quality sensor choices
Quick verify function to check monitor calibration

"KODAK Display Manager Systema breakthrough from KODAK Color Science. KODAK Display Manager System calibrates, characterizes and uses KODAK Color Science and 3D LUT technology to enable display devices to simulate the look of projected print film. So everyone in the postproduction workflow has a visual reference of what will eventually appear on screen."

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Digital SLR and Software For Preview :

>A link to the Kodak Look Manager System:

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/products/dlmanage/

klms.jhtml?id=0.1.4.16&lc=en

>KODAK Look Manager System allows a director of photography to previsualize a story's look before exposing a frame of film. It can then be shared as a digital recipe with other team members director, camera crew, dailies colorist, lab, print timer anyone who needs a precise visual reference. Combine it with the new KODAK Display Manager System to ensure that all digital display devices are calibrated to accurately simulate the look of projected print film.

>KODAK Look Manager System :

>* Allows you to apply KODAK Film stocks with a variety of filters, lenses, effects and more.

>* Lets you communicate and maintain creative intent from shoot to post.

>* Lets all members of the production and postproduction teams collaborate.

>* Allows the lab to accurately match the exact look established in pre-production even years later.

>* Makes it easy to share via posting to FTP site, e-mail or hard copy.

>* Maintains color and image integrity all the way through, no matter how many times you change or update the look.

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Kodak Look Management System . . . Just Wondering :

>Links to the Kodak Look Manager System, and the Kodak Display Manager System :

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/products/dlmanage/klms.jhtml?

id=0.1.4.16&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/products/dlmanage/kdm.

jhtml?id=0.1.4.18&lc=en

>These are intended primarily as a communication tool, so everyone in the production and post production chain is speaking the same language, while looking at the same simulation of "look" alternatives on their respective displays :

>Now you can pre-visualize the look of your next project and share it with everyone in the chain.

>A product of KODAK Color Science, KODAK Look Manager System allows a director of photography to pre-visualize a story's look before exposing a frame of film. It can then be shared as a digital recipe with other team members director, camera crew, dailies colorist, lab, print timer anyone who needs a precise visual reference. Combine it with the new KODAK Display Manager System to ensure that all digital display devices are calibrated to accurately simulate the look of projected print film.

>Now every workstation can display the look of projected motion picture film.

>How do you ensure display devices in a Burbank studio and a Tokyo lab are displaying not just the same tone and color, but the look of the final print film? KODAK Display Manager Systema breakthrough from KODAK Color Science. KODAK Display Manager System calibrates, characterizes and uses KODAK Color Science and 3D LUT technology to enable display devices to simulate the look of projected print film. So everyone in the postproduction workflow has a visual reference of what will eventually appear on screen.

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company


>Optical Sound Stock :

>KODAK Panchromatic Sound Recording Film 2374/3374 is on polyester (ESTAR) base, and perforated 35mm KS-1866 (not the BH-1866 normally used in cameras) or 16mm 1R-2994 (FTO).

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/products/lab/2374.jhtml?

id=0.1.4.10.4.4&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com/US/plugins/acrobat/en/motion/catalog/

interfilm04.pdf

>John Pytlak
Eastman Kodak Company