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class="style18"> Slider

>Published : 8th October 2008

>I am looking for suggestions on Sliders, after doing some online research I have come across about 6 different models.

>I have used a couple of them but don’t remember the makers or model #s.

>This is what I remember, one of them was a bit noisy, another one was sticky on the start of the move and another one was hard to reconfigure.

>Any help would be greatly appreciated.

>Thank you.

>Chong Pak


class="style19">>>I am looking for suggestions on Sliders, after doing some online research I have come across >>about 6 different models.
>>I have used a couple of them but don’t remember the makers or model #s.

>Best one I have ever used and the one I use the most is the "JB Slider"

>http://www.jbslider.com/

>Eric Fletcher SOC
Steadicam/"A" Camera Operator
Los Angeles, CA USA


>A good thing to do is test the slider with the weight of the camera you'd most likely be using on it. I've encountered at least one popular brand of slider (I'll have to look up which one) that works great with heavy cameras but not so good with light ones.

>For example, I had a Varicam on one and had a hell of a time getting it to run smoothly... until I started leaning on it during takes. That improved the slider's motion considerably. It probably works fine with a Panaflex, a 1000' mag and a zoom.

>Art Adams
Director of Photography
Film | Hidef | Video

> San Jose, CA, USA
www.artadams.net
415.760.5167
Skype: ArtAtoms


class="style19">> I am looking for suggestions on Sliders...

>A key grip I work with has the nicest one I've seen. It is "The Slider".
www.theslider.com
Very smooth, rotation can be indexed and locked, stops are adjustable, and it can be inverted. Oh, and it's quiet.

>Cheers,

>Rod Williams
Motion Picture and HD First Camera Assistant
Petaluma, California
U.S.A.
(707) 778-7524 Home
(415) 309-3407 Cell


class="style19">>>A key grip I work with has the nicest one I've seen.
>>It is "The Slider". Very smooth, rotation can be indexed and locked, stops are adjustable, and it can >>be inverted.

>Arrrggghhhh Used it and hated it. it's HUGE and not as smooth as the JB Slider

>Eric Fletcher SOC
Steadicam/"A" Camera Operator
Los Angeles, CA USA


>I think it was about 15 years ago that someone "discovered" that the adjustable Ubangi for the Panther was smooth enough to move in shot, and the slider was "re-invented." It isn't exactly a slider per se, but for a versatile product that is also quite affordable to own, check out the CamTram.

>Disclaimer: we are the distributor for the product, but it's still a great little rig, light & priced right.

>Mitch Gross
NYC DP/TD
Abel Cine Tech


>A friend of mine makes these. I know he leases them, but if you talk to him he may sell also. His name is Evan Nelson. Very good product, quiet.

>Lot's of operators who have used it love it.

>Here's the link.

>http://www.e-slide.com/

>Good Luck,

>Earl Perque
BB Grip
IA Local 80
IA Local 477
Florida


class="style19">> Used it and hated it

>Well, there it is.. different strokes and all that. The DP I work with really loved it. Ours was *very* smooth. We were shooting small products. It *is* bigger but has a lot of features (like handles!!). We especially liked the ability to rotate on the base and lock it in place quickly. Plus the slider lock and drag were particularly effective.

>From any maker, these camera sliders are a great new-ish innovation. It makes many heretofore impossible shots easy and creates opportunities to put the camera in places with speed and ease. I think it really speeds up production on the right kind of job. Plus it is fantastic for table-top/product shots. Lots of folks seem to be making them these days so it would behove you to get a few in your hands and play around with them to compare.

>Rod Williams
Motion Picture and HD First Camera Assistant
Petaluma, California
U.S.A.
(707) 778-7524 Home
(415) 309-3407 Cell


class="style19">>>From any maker, these camera sliders are a great new-ish innovation. I think it really speeds up >>production on the right kind of job.

>Especially good for those jail bar shots.

>Edwin Myers, Atlanta


>Without mentioning names or specific suppliers, one thing you may notice in playing with various sliders is that the ones that use round track and recirculating ball bearings tend to be a bit noisy - they sizzle a little as the balls recirculate. Depending on who has made them and how, if they have their "wipers" still on the bearings, they will create a bit of stiction - removing the wipers makes the starts and stops easier. There are some with so-called Tee track with recirculating ball bearing travellers - they make a bit of sizzle too.

>The ones with wheels tend to be a bit quieter than the recirculating ball pillow block ones, but this is a gross generalization - your mileage may vary etc. On the other hand, the recirculating ball ones are VERY smooth.

>Mark Weingartner
LA based


class="style19">>>From any maker, these camera sliders are a great new-ish innovation.

I love the "newish" element of old technology regurgitated...


Many New Yorkers probably remember the beam system that Ferco used to have for rental...and somewhere in my garage is a piece of Twin-rail that we "borrowed" a decade ago to use as a slider for a camera ... and when I say borrowed - it was at least another decade older than that in its first life as a motion control linear mover...

>Heck, I've even seen people invent things that can be seen in "making of" videos of things that I've done years earlier...full in the knowledge that someone has probably done the very same thing earlier than that.

>Mark H. Weingartner
LA based innovator (or re-purposer?)


>Mark H. Weingartner wrote:

class="style19">>> Many New Yorkers probably remember the beam system that Ferco used to have for rental...

>The Ferco Monorail Dolly. If I remember correctly, first feature it was used on was the film "Been Down So Long It Seems Like Up to Me" -- an unseen AFI-sponsored feature from back when they sponsored features, late 60s. (What about the other lost AFI feature, Stanton Kaye's "Pursuit of Treasure.")

>I recall seeing it supporting a blimped CM3.

>With that useless piece of information out of the way, Happy 2007, everyone!

>Jeff "the first two hours have been ok" Kreines


Mark H. Weingartner wrote :


> I love the "newish" element of old technology regurgitated...

>The various sliders being a perfect example. In an American Cinematographer magazine back issue -- way back when it was still published with Amateur Movie*-- there is an article with pictures about a slider devised by a cameraman for "saving" over the shoulder shots.

>Of course, it didn't have modern linear bearings, but the principle is the same, which may come as a bit of a surprise to current manufacturers who may be planning to obtain patents. (I may still have a copy of the article. I'll try to find it.)

class="style19">>>Many New Yorkers probably remember the beam system that Ferco used to have for rental...

>Ah yes, the Monorail. I remember once helping to set it up in the woods over some relatively rough terrain without any thought having been given as to how the operator would be able to operate. We then had to build two level and secure walkways one for the operator behind the rail and one for the AC in front of the rail which took about ten times longer than setting up the Monorail itself.

>*Historical note: American Cinematographer magazine was not always the slick publication that it currently is. At one time -- prior to 1939, I think -- it was printed with another magazine called Amateur Movie, complete with a second cover page.

>The two publications were separated at the fold where the pages were stapled. So that if you bought American Cinematographer, then AC would be on the cover and Amateur Movie would be inside after the fold. And if you bought Amateur Movie, then AM would be on the cover and AC would be inside after the fold. The two versions were identical except for the way they were stapled and folded after printing.

>Brian Heller
IA 600 DP


>Whilst it is a British product, Ronford Bakers slider is excellent. Used one for some time now. Well made, fantastic engineering and thoroughly nice chaps that run the company. I am sure there are US distributors but cost may be an issue because of this... www.ronfordbaker.co.uk

>Michael Timney
UK DOP


>Michael Timney wrote:

class="style19">>>Whilst it is a British product, Ronford Bakers slider is excellent. Used one for some time now. Well >>made, fantastic engineering and thoroughly nice chaps that run the company.

>If there I a slider on Ronford's site, I couldn't find it. Nor have their US Distributors mentioned it.

>Do you have any more details?

>Thanks,

>Brian Heller
IA 600 DP


>A relatively new slider I have been trying to try out on a job is the "Silent Cat":

>www.thatcatcamerasupport.com

>Played with it at a demo and was impressed by some of its unique features:

>Bottom rotating Mitchell mount can be removed, or relocated anywhere along the unit to cantilever like a ubangi.

>Open tubular structure allows the camera to be quickly over or underslung, without tools.

>Plenty of room for the tripod head tie-downs.

>Variable resistance fluid damper on the trolley to match resistance on the head (a very welcome option in my book).

>Lightweight and apparently very quiet (not able to verify silence on show floor). comes in 3, 4, 5 foot versions.

>Impressed so far, looking forward to real world test. No affiliation, just admiration for an improved product,

>Alan Jacobsen
DP - NYC